Reece Grenades

To all of those wives and girlfriends of gamer guys out there…

Next time your guy is playing one of the first person shooters, grab some mini Reece cups or some treat that is comparable and throw it toward him – not at him but in the general vicinity of where he might be able to catch the item and it has to be in his field of view. See how good his reflexes really are and not just in the game. This could bring some real live effects to his in-game action. Just beware since you might not know how he might react – gauge it on his normal personality to make sure he wouldn’t react angrily.

I just threw my husband two mini Reece cups while he was playing Uncharted 2 and he caught one in mid-air and the other dropped. He joked that it felt like he had grenades thrown at him.

Just a little fun!

SecuritySwitch Grows Up on Google Code

Edit: Due to a trademark infringement, this open source project will now be named SecuritySwitch. What a huge PITA it was to migrate to a new project on Google Code! Since you cannot rename a project, I had to create a new one and move everything over to it. I so enjoyed blowing 2 hours of my day off on Good Friday.

I recently posted about an update to my WebPageSecurity module project to the newly named SecuritySwitch. One of the best ways to ramp up coding on the project again is to get it into a public code repository.

Get with Git?

I thought about using Git on GitHub, but I want to get moving on this and that would not be the case if I had to fumble through learning Git now. Although, I do really like the concept of a distributed version control system (DVCS). Instead, I will stick with Subversion (SVN) for now.

Google Code

That lands the project in the capable arms of Google Code, which I find to be a very nice new home for SecuritySwitch. I will likely have a dedicated page here on GeekFreeq for SecuritySwitch that refers visitors to the project on Google Code, and/or I will just pipe updates from the project site here via RSS.

Anyway, this is the first stage of a “grown-up” SecuritySwitch.