SecuritySwitch Grows Up on Google Code

Edit: Due to a trademark infringement, this open source project will now be named SecuritySwitch. What a huge PITA it was to migrate to a new project on Google Code! Since you cannot rename a project, I had to create a new one and move everything over to it. I so enjoyed blowing 2 hours of my day off on Good Friday.

I recently posted about an update to my WebPageSecurity module project to the newly named SecuritySwitch. One of the best ways to ramp up coding on the project again is to get it into a public code repository.

Get with Git?

I thought about using Git on GitHub, but I want to get moving on this and that would not be the case if I had to fumble through learning Git now. Although, I do really like the concept of a distributed version control system (DVCS). Instead, I will stick with Subversion (SVN) for now.

Google Code

That lands the project in the capable arms of Google Code, which I find to be a very nice new home for SecuritySwitch. I will likely have a dedicated page here on GeekFreeq for SecuritySwitch that refers visitors to the project on Google Code, and/or I will just pipe updates from the project site here via RSS.

Anyway, this is the first stage of a “grown-up” SecuritySwitch.

WebPageSecurity becomes SecuritySwitch

Edit: Due to a trademark infringement, this open source project will now be named SecuritySwitch. Feel free to read the comment posted by the holder of the trademark on the name I originally planned to use. It was a polite enough message. I think there may be ground for me to stand on with the first name, but I don’t care to go to court over the name of a project that is free for anyone to download.

After a bit of a struggle supporting my WebPageSecurity module on Code Project, I’ve decided to put some quality effort into the project in the very near future. One of the first things that needed attention was the name.

What’s in a Name?

Could I have named it something more generic all those years ago? Perhaps, but not likely. After a few minutes of running through some of the key nouns and verbs that describe the project’s purpose, it will now be known as SecuritySwitch.

Educational Value vs. Quality Functionality

Another change to the project will be the maintenance of the dual source code languages. Since I originally started the module, a distinct project for C# and VB.NET have been maintained. While this was great for the educational aspect of the article and accompanying code, it is not ideal for a quality “product”.

After some consideration, I decided to drop the VB.NET version of the source code in favor of a single project written in C#. An immediate benefit to the community of this decision is faster releases.

What’s Next?

All of this change should be balanced with something to make it all worth while. I intend on stopping development on the 2.x version of the module for .NET 1.1 where it is now. Of course, I’ll fix any bugs, but no new features will likely be added. Version 3.x for .NET 2.0 will continue until version 4.0. That’s when I will add some of the new features in the queue and enable full support for ASP.NET MVC as well.

Keep checking back for more progress on this project.

ASP.NET “Remember Me” Option with Forms Authentication Not Working?

ASP.NET Login Control
ASP.NET Login Control

So, you’ve set the timeout value for forms authentication to a fairly large value, yet checking the “remember me” check box on the Login control still does not persist your users’ authentication, even after a fairly short period of inactivity.

<system.web>
    ...
    <authentication mode="Forms">
        <forms timeout="10080"/>
    </authentication>
    ...
</system.web>

Don’t spend hours trying to figure out why this, seemingly, basic functionality doesn’t perform as it should. The solution to this problem is very simple, albeit somewhat obscure.

Continue reading ASP.NET “Remember Me” Option with Forms Authentication Not Working?

Web Page Security – New Version

Some of you know me as a friend and code poet. Some know me as the crazy guy trying to get donations for his dad to get him a Wii. Some just know me as “that guy who wrote the web page security module for ASP.NET“. Others don’t know me at all; how did you end up here by the way?

Well, I am finally setting out to write the next version of the web page security module. I have quite a list of features requested by its many users. The fact is, I’ve been wanting to write the new version for nearly 2 years now. I have an idea that will make this thing so much more usable that I’m beginning to doubt its efficiency. So, before I begin putting too much effort into it, I will be running some tests, like a responsible programmer.

I suspect the new method I have in mind will be a bit more CPU-intensive. The problem is, I have no idea how much more CPU I can expect the algorithm to use. I’ll see how my tests go, beginning tonight. If the metrics show an acceptable increase in CPU (I’ll have to decide what is acceptable), I will begin coding the new version this week.

Stay tuned.